KinoKultura: Issue 44 (2014)

Some Statistics on Film Production and Distribution 2002-2012 (Segida-Info)

By Miroslava Segida (Moscow)

This page comprises some statistical observations in the field of cinema, television and digital video, which are limited by the following parameters:

I wanted to make some independent observations, dividing the area of research on cinema, television, video, and web. However, considering that almost every film director would like to do a project aimed at a large audience (now television), I decided to work with the entire field, bearing in mind that producers and crews generally work in all formats.


1. Film Production

Table of film production: 2002-2011 (cinema, DVD, TV, web)

Year Projects Cinema DVD web TV 1-4 series TV 5-9 series TV 10-24 series TV 25-59 series TV 60-100 TV >100 series
2002
178
66
24
32
17(1)
31(2)
5(1)
2 (1)
1(1)
2003
228
71(1)
21
45(2)
29(2)
54(8)
5(2)
-
3(1)
2004
253
90(4)
19
47(1)
32
55(3)
7(4)
3
-
2005
262
80(1)
18
56
37(1)
60(1)
6
3
2(1)
2006
351
118(3)
25
89
36(1)
52(2)
15(5)
3(1)
13(2)
2007
451
127(6)
28
1
176
40
55(1)
7(5)
7(1)
10(3)
2008
453
123(3)
28
1
181(1)
28
62(2)
18(6)
6(2)
6
2009
388
109(2)
40
97
50(1)
67
15(3)
3(1)
7
2010
448
121(4)
44
1
140
21
87(4)
18(4)
10(4)
6
2011
463
92(3)
18
2
164
47
103(4)
17(1)
8(2)
12(2)
                     
∑ projects 3,475 998(27) 265
5
1,027(4)
337(6)
626(27)
113(31)
45(2)
60(6)
                     
∑ TV series 31,962 (5,034)      
2,207(4)
2,642(46)
7,068(258)
4,794(1,029)
3,106(890)

12,145
2,807)

Notes:
A serial is considered as a separate entity.
Column "Cinema": full-length feature films, animation in brackets
Columns "TV serials": in brackets the number of series
If the production of a serial extends over several years, the year of completion is given.
Serials, which started broadcasting in 2011, but where production continues, are not included
Television versions of films are listed in column 3 and not included in columns 5–6. Film versions of television projects already included in columns 5–6 are not listed in column 3.
Television almanacs are listed according to the number of episodes; the almanac is treated as a feature film.


2. Film Distribution

Number of organizations which participated in the production of 3,476 projects (2002-2011): 2112
Moscow: 1023, St Petersburg: 98, Kiev: 47, Ekaterinburg: 17, Minsk: 11

Films released before 2012 with a circulation above 1,000 copies: 11.
1,467 – Six Degrees of Celebration 2 (Elki 2; 2011, Bazelevs Production; Distribution: 20th-Century Fox CIS)
1,400 – Vysotskii. Thank God I’m Alive (Vysotskii. Spasibo chto zhivoi, 2011, Monumental Pictures, Direktsiia kino; Distribution: WDSSPR)
1,350 – Shadow Boxing. The Last Round (Boi s ten’iu, 2011, Central Partnership)
1,300 – Ivan Tsarevich and the Grey Wolf (Ivan tsarevich i seryi volk, 2011, СТВ, Mel’nitsa; Distribution: Nashe kino)
1,107 – The Admiral (2008, Direktsiia kino; Distribution: 20th-Century Fox CIS)

Number of cinemas in Russia: 925
Number of halls: 2726
Number of digitally equipped halls: 1472

Films with a box office over $ 1 million: 148 fiction features, 13 animation features
Films with a box office less than $1 million: 274 fiction features, 9 animation features
Films without distribution: 551 fiction features, 5 animation features
Profitable films: 63 fiction features, 8 animation features

Most profitable films (2002-2011), with box office vs. budget in USD in brackets:

Films with professional awards and festival prizes: 487 (festivals in the former USSR: 98; A-class festivals: 15)
Films shown on television: 686
Films made with participation of or commissioned by television channels: 56

Television projects with professional awards and festival prizes: 203
Television projects not aired by 1 July 2012: 283
Television projects removed from television programs after the first series: 8

The longest-running serial: Wedding Ring (Obruchal’noe kol’tso, 2008-2012, 809 series, Telenovel Production; shown on Channel One).


3. Co-Production

Table on Co-production (2002-2011):

co-investor cinema television video
Austria
2
Azerbaijan
7
1
Argentina
3
Belarus
6
14
Belgium
2
Bulgaria
1
Brasil
1
Canada
1
China
1
Cuba
1
1
Cyprus
1
Czech Rep.
2
1
Estonia
3
Finland
6
France
27
4
Georgia
5
2
Germany
32
1
Greece
2
Hong Kong
1
Hungary
1
1
1
India
1
Israel
5
2
Italy
15
1
Kazakhstan
20
6
1
Kyrgyzstan
2
Latvia
3
Lithuania
3
2
Luxemburg
2
Malaysia
1
Montenegro
1
Morocco
1
Moldova
1
Netherlands
12
1
Norway
1
Poland
5
1
Portugal
1
Romania
1
Spain
6
1
South Korea
1
Switzerland
7
Sweden
2
Syria
1
Tajikistan
1
Ukraine
29
240
United Kingdom
7
1
2
U.S.A
21
7
4
Venezuela
1

 


4. Creative Teams
The number of creative teams of the film community, who participated in the production of fiction films made between 2002-2011 (essential duties). The gender proportion (m/f) is indicated in brackets. A serial counts as independent project.

Producers: 1,756 (1,325/431)
737 producers made more than 2 projects
34 producers made more than 50 projects
4 producers made more than 100 projects

Directors: 1,692 (1,086/507)
910 directors made more than 2 projects
99 directors made more than 10 projects
19 directors made more than 20 projects
Overlapping professions (i.e. directors who would turn producers, etc.):

Scriptwriters: 3,258 (2,384/874)
Script Groups (as legal entity): 6
1,460 scriptwriters wrote more than 2 scripts
190 scriptwriters wrote more than 10 scripts
49 scriptwriters wrote more than 20 scripts
Overlapping professions:

Cameramen: 1,028 (986/42)
590 cameramen filmed more than 2 projects
155 cameramen filmed more than 10 projects
35 cameramen filmed more than 20 projects
Overlapping professions:

Production Designers: 1,056 (795/251)
518 production designers were involved in more than 2 projects
139 production designers were involved in more than 10 projects
26 production designers were involved in more than 20 projects
Overlapping professions:

Costume designers: 800 (246/554)
455 costume designers were involved in more than 2 projects
103 costume designers were involved in more than 10 projects
17 costume designers were involved in more than 20 projects
Overlapping professions:

Composers: 1,066 (990/76)
Musical groups: 21
458 composers in more than 2 projects
91 composers in more than 10 projects
34 composers in more than 20 projects
Overlapping professions:

Sound producers: 1,028 (896/132)
579 sound producers worked on more than 2 projects
121 sound producers worked on more than 10 projects
32 sound producers worked on more than 20 projects
Overlapping professions:

Editors: 1,167 (880/287) [2]
542 film editors have worked on more than 2 projects
107 film editors have worked on more than 10 projects
34 film editors have worked on more than 20 projects
Overlapping professions:

Actors: 26,490 (16,302/10,188) [3]
Children: 1,986
11,639 actors/actresses have played more than 2 roles
2,351 actors/actresses have played more than 10 roles
1,013 actors/actresses have played more than 20 roles
107 actors/actresses have played more than 50 roles
Overlapping professions:
Producers (430); directors (958); scriptwriters (462); production designers (122); costume designers (43); composers (92); musicians (170); singers (169); songwriters (31); sound producers (45); film editors (58); television presenter (111); sportsmen (81); models (72).

Notes:
1] In art-house projects directors are, as a rule, also production designers
2] During 1992-2001 the balance of male and female editors was given; until 1992 editors were basically women, in auteur cinema the director also edited, which is usually not recorded in the credits. Film editors today actively move into other professions. Thus, the proportion of editors who turn directors is considerably higher (20:1) than the move from director to editor which takes place, as a rule, in auteur projects, i.e. directors of digital editing become directors, producers and so on.
3] Excluding actors in episodes.


5. People
For the last ten years (2002-2011) 53,600 people who form the essential crew (listed in the credits) have participated in film production

Leaders in production (cinema/television):
Producers
Vlad Riashin – 206 (204/2)
Aleksandr Kushaev – 136 (130/6)
Ruben Dishdishian –  114 (65/49)
Aleksandr Rodnianskii –  107 (91/16) + 6 [3]

Directors [1]
Kirill Kapitsa – 35 (22)
Dmitrii Fiks – 34 (27)
Aleksandr Polynnikov – 29 (26)
Igor’ Moskvitin – 27(6)
Mikhail Tumanishvili – 25 (16)
Aleksandr Burtsev – 24 (18)

Scriptwriters [2]
Ganna Slutski – 27
Aleksei Timm – 27
Denis Karyshev – 26
Denis Rodimin – 26

Scriptwriting Groups
Kulagin and Partners [Kulagin i partnery] – 48
The Trace [Sled] – 30
One Day there will be Love [Odnazhdy budet liubov’] – 27

DoP [1]
Dmitrii Mass – 51 (22)
Dmitrii Pliusin – 50 (19)
Timur Iskiandarov – 45 (31)
Ivan Bagaev – 36 (16)

Actors
Mikhail Bogdasarov – 115 roles
Vladimir Sterzhakov – 102 roles
Egor Barinov – 100 roles
Mikhail Efremov – 96 roles
Roman Madianov – 95 roles
Aleksandr Tiutin – 92 roles
Ivan Agapov – 91 roles
Aleksandr Bashirov – 88 roles
Sergei Iushkevich – 86 roles

Actresses
Ol’ga Khokhlova– 114 roles
Raisa Riazanova – 92 roles
Tat’iana Liutaeva – 73 roles

Child actors
Vasilii Brykov – 39 roles

Musicians
Sergei Shnurov – 21 projects

TV presenters:
Ivan Urgant – 15 roles

Notes
1] including serials (in brackets)
2] scriptwriters, filming their own scripts
3] non-Russian projects


6. Thematic Preferences
Genres
Melodrama (1,042); detective film (931); drama (832); comedy (580); action (261); thriller (210; of which 8 horror); adventure film (180); tragicomedy (107); historical film (113; incl. 42 historical-biographical); tele-novella (91); musical film (79); road movie (61); fantasy (47); fairy tale (35); Sci-Fi (15); musical (13); remake (24)

Topics
Crime (521); love triangle (328); police (178); war (194, including 62 spy films)—of these: WWII (113); Afghan War (35); Caucasus wars (27); Civil War (19)—; student/youth (189); conquest of Moscow (172); mysticism (122); Christmas (105); school (102); inheritance (96); office (87); medicine (57); terror/anti-terror (51); mothers & daughters (49); Special Forces (45); escape from Moscow (40); cinema about cinema (20);
Recent/new topics: amnesia (21); surrogate motherhood (7); body swap (7); group suicide (4).

Historical setting
12th century (2); 16th century (4); 17th century (2); 18th century (17); 19th century (22).
20th century:
1900-1910 (12); 1920s (18); 1930s (40); 1940s (118); 1950s (27); 1960s (25); 1970s (41); 1980s (56); 1990s (78).

Characters
The most popular historical characters in projects 2002-2011: curiously Lenin, who would earlier have headed such lists, appears only three times as historical character, and twice as a double. The people’s favourite Iurii Gagarin features only in three projects.

Stalin (24); Beriya (21); Brezhnev (14); Khrushchev (11); Hitler (7; thrice as a character’s nickname); Zhukov (8); Malenkov (6); Ivan the Terrible (5); Peter the Great (5).

Adaptations: 841
—of a contemporary writer:
Tat’iana Ustinova (15); Dar’ia Dontsova (12); Natal’ia Andreeva (9); Andrei Kivinov (8); Andrei Konstantinov (8); Viktoriia Tokareva (7); Ganna Slutska (6); Vladimir Grin’kov (6); Ekaterina Vil’mont (5); Andrei Voronin (5); Viacheslav Zhukov (5); Danila Koretskii (5); Anna Malysheva (5); Aleksandra Marinina (5); Nadezhda Ptushkina (5); Oleg Roy (5); Dina Rubina (5); Boris Akunin (4); Anna Berseneva (4); Aleksandr Bushkov (4); Dmitrii Gerasimov (4); Vladimir Kolychev (4); Mikhail Mart [Michael Utcher] (4); Viktor Merezhko (4); Viktoriia Platova (4); Iurii Poliakov (4); Aleksandr Rogov (4); Evgenii Sartinov (4); Eduard Topol’ (4); Valentin Azernikov (3); Aleksei Birger (3); Eduard Volodarskii (3); Iurii Goriainov (3); Stanislav Gurin (3); Aleksandr Zviagintsev (3); Alina Znamenskaia (3); Sergei Kozlov (3); Sergei Luk’ianenko (3); Anatolii Stepanov (3); Leonid Iuzefovich (3).

—of a classical writer:
Anton Chekhov (11); Vasilii Shukshin (9); Aleksandr Ostrovskii (8); Nikolai Gogol’ (7); Valentin Pikul’ (5); Lev Tolstoi (5); Mikhail Bulgakov (4); Fedor Dostoevskii (4); Arkadii Averchenko (3); Andrei Platonov (3); Aleksandr Pushkin (3); Daniil Kharms (3).


7. Some Peculiarities of Project Titles

Film titles are a complete bummer: there are titles which are repeated twice or three times, but there are also projects which float on channels and DVDs under different titles. Thus the fifth block of a popular serial with a double title received a third title: Streets of the Broken Lights-5 / Cops-5 / The Latest Adventures of the Cops. Such doubles with different names are frequent. This is a first caution.

The words “amnesia”, “dosh [bablo]”, “bucks”, “gastarbeiter”, “glamour”, “gloss”, “tinsel [zhest’]”, “casting”, “killer”, “mafia”, “rubbish [musor]”, “pops [popsa]”, “cool [prikol]”, “sex”, “super”, “surrogate” and “SMS” have already appeared in titles, but so far in singular numbers (except for the words “casting”, “sex”, “super” and “killer”, which have appeared 4, 6, 9 and 11 times respectively). The titles of projects have extensions: .net (1), .com (1), .ru (7), adding superfluous meaning.

The word “death” (in conjunction with “dead” and “corpse”), earlier taking the third position, has emerged onto the second, having outstripped the word “Russian” (which held second position until 2002). And quite unexpectedly comes the place of the numeral “two” with its all derivatives: dual [dvoinoi], double [dvoinik], two [dvoe], together [vdvoem], etc. The word “gold” was always widely used, but never came among the top five positions.

During the period 2002-2011 the word “love” with its all derivatives comes up in the titles of 150 projects (by comparison: in the 1990s it was used 54 times), but there are projects where this word sounds twice (e.g. Love as Love, 2007) and three times (e.g. Love and other Nonsense… Love or not love, 2010); there are, however, only five antonyms: “unloved” [neliubimyi] (1), “to not love” [ne liubit’] (1), “hatred [nenavist’] (2); “to hate” [nenavidet’] (1). The innermost phrase “I love you” in titles of domestic films appeared for the first time in 2004, as “I love you”; it was then repeated in 2011, and it already had an echo, “I don’t love you”, in 2012. That is the second caution.

List of the most frequent words in project titles (2002-2011):
Love (150); Death (75); Two (70); Gold (60); Last (53); Happiness (52); Russian (46); House (43); Law (43); Day (41); Black (40); Night (35); Kill (34); Blood (33); Three (33); History (33); Secret (31); Fate (29); Woman (29); Star (27); Moscow (27); Hunt (26); First (26); Event (26); Mother/Mum (25 [11/14]); Father/Dad (25 [12/13]); Red (24); Passion (24).

The words defining the genre of a project take a place in the titles: the word “detective” is used 17 times, “comedy” twice, “melodrama” once, while the word “drama” is absent.

The longest film title is “Secrets of Palace Revolutions. Russia. 18th century. The Emperor’s Second Bride”. The shortest are: “4”, “O” [O], “I” [Ia].

The second peculiarity of projects titles from 2002-2011 is the active use of proper names. Yet the historical-biographical genre is almost absent from the list below, as most frequently these are melodramas (or maybe comedies, which is subjective), and less often dramas which are based on biographical material. 

Historical characters in film titles:
A.P. (Aleksandr Pushkin); Boris Godunov; Brezhnev; Chekhovian Motifs; Churchill [not about Churchill]; Death in a Pince-Nez, or Our Chekhov; Dostoevskii; Esenin; Farewell, Doctor Chekhov; Furtseva; Gagarin; Galina (Brezhneva); Hitler’s kaput!; Hunt on Beriya; Ivan the Terrible; Korolev; Kotovskii; Lenin’s Testament [not about Lenin]; Mayakovsky. Two Days; Nine Lives of Nestor Makhno; Peter the First. The Testament; Rasputin; Savva; Savva Morozov; Shukshin’s Tales; Stalin; Live, Comrade Stalin; Stalin’s Wife; A Gift to Stalin; Taras Bulba; Utesov; Vysotsky. Thank God I’m Alive; Wolf Messing (2); Yeltsin: Three Days in August; Zhukov

Among names and surnames featuring in titles (excluding historical characters), female names are predominant, especially Anna, Katia, Masha, Nadia and Liuba; among surnames, the men’s names are dominant, often with an epithet to qualify their rank (captain, detective inspector, etc.)

The personal pronoun “I” was not frequently used in Soviet cinema. It features in 48 projects in the nominative and in 33 projects in other cases, largely taking the place of the subject. Examples: Who am I? [Kto ia?]; It Doesn’t Hurt [Mne ne bol’no]; He, She and I [On, ona i ia]; Because it’s me [Potomu chto eto ia]; You and Me [Ty i ia]; You is Me [Ty eto ia], Me [Ia]; Me not me [Ia ne ia], etc.

The possessive pronoun “my” occurs 94 times. The personal pronoun “we”, again frequently used in Soviet film titles, appears only 5 times, (three times as “we”, twice as “us”), which can be explained by the breaking down into its constituent individual names.

The main peculiarity of the list of film titles from 2002-2011 is the frequency of a direct address to the audience; most often, this is in the form of the personal address “ty”, for example: Be with me [Bud’ so mnoi]; Take me with you [Voz’mi menia s soboi], Don’t even think [Dazeh ne dumai!], etc.


Segida-Info. A Commentary
The sector of the film-industry has lost the borders for its definition and, hence, the opportunities of logical action inside. This space is not that of film or television projects, but of projects in general, among which one could find someone’s things, converted into a film for some dubious reasons. The comment on the matrix “conversation with the spectator”, as well as other, not less ridiculous matrixes, is such: it is evidence of a collective paranoia which has seized society as a whole. That is, the practical realization of any idea directed at the improvement of the film industry, including targeted strategies of state funding, is doomed to failure.
Ask an unfortunate autistic person, let’s call him Kolia: “What is your name, boy?”. And the boy will answer: “You’re called Kolia.”
The End.

Miroslava Segida
Moscow

Translated by Birgit Beumers


These statistical observations have been derived from the database “Electronic Catalogue of Russian films, 1908-present" (authors: Miroslava Segida and Sergei Zemlianukhin; created in Access; program support by Viacheslav Popov).

Miroslava Segida © 2014

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Updated: 18 Apr 14